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Unique Stool Design Utilizes Offcut Wood Combined With Resin to Eliminate Construction Waste

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Seeking a way to reduce waste as part of their industrial design practice, South Korean design studio HATTERN conceived of a hybrid resin and wood seating concept called Zero Per Stool. As part of the construction process the waste offcut from creating the legs are saved and then combined with resin to form the stool’s seat. The resulting objects have almost zero waste and appear visually unique from piece to piece—each stool subtly paying tribute to its own construction process. HATTERN also adopted the same process for a series of resin coasters that make use of scrap wood materials. You can follow more of their recent work on Facebook. (via Design Milk)

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gevil
5 days ago
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São Paulo -- Brazil
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Smithsonian Announces Eye-Opening Finalists of Their 14th Annual Photo Contest

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© Michael B. Hardie. All rights reserved. All photos courtesy Smithsonian.

Smithsonian just released the 70 finalists for their 14th annual photo contest and is currently accepting votes for their Readers’ Choice award. This year Smithsonian received some 48,000 submissions from photographers in 146 countries and territories from which they selected finalists in 7 categories: Natural World, The American Experience, Travel, People, Altered Images, Mobile, and Sustainable Travel. Selected here are some of our favorites, but you can see the rest and vote for your favs on their website.

© Lina Samoukova. All rights reserved.

© Sharon Castellanos. All rights reserved.

© Liam Wong. All rights reserved.

© rekha Bobade. All rights reserved.

© Luis Henry Agudelo Cano. All rights reserved.

© vickson dasan. All rights reserved.

© Pier Luigi Dodi. All rights reserved.

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gevil
5 days ago
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São Paulo -- Brazil
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Billboards That Advertise the Surrounding California Landscape by Jennifer Bolande

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All photos by Lance Gerber / courtesy of the artist and Desert X

Jennifer Bolande‘s work Visible Distance / Second Sight, is not one that you stop your car at and observe, in fact, its not one that even requires slowing to admire. The several billboard installation stretches alongside the Gene Autry Trail and Vista Chino in California, bordering the roads with scenic images of the same mountains that peak out behind each piece. In some instances the images match perfectly with the surrounding range, creating an alignment of fabricated reality while one zooms past the display.

Similar to artist Brian Kane‘s billboard displays of forests and galaxies in Massachusetts in the summer of 2015, Bolande’s work calls attention to nature in a ceaseless vacuum of pushy advertising. By placing images of the environment beside the roadway Bolande hopes to point passersby back to the landscape itself.

The piece is part of the exhibition Desert X which also features Doug Aitken’s mirror-covered house. The exhibition runs through April 30, 2017, and you can see a full schedule of tours and events on their website. (via Designboom)

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gevil
5 days ago
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São Paulo -- Brazil
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Elegant Wooden Birds Dipped in Watercolor Plumage by Moisés Hernández

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Immersed Birds, 2017. Ash and watercolor.

Mexican designer Moisés Hernández brings his distinct flare for minimalism to this new series of avian sculptures titled Immersed Birds. Each piece is a continuous wooden object milled with CNC technology which is then dipped into a carefully considered sequence of watercolors. The overlaying hues mimic the plumage of a toucan, hummingbird, and Mexican quetzal. You can see more of Hernández’s work on Instagram. (via Booooooom)

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gevil
5 days ago
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São Paulo -- Brazil
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Chat Systems

12 Comments and 28 Shares
I'm one of the few Instagram users who connects solely through the Unix 'talk' gateway.
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gevil
5 days ago
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São Paulo -- Brazil
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10 public comments
tante
11 days ago
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The Internet will connect us all ... just not really
Oldenburg/Germany
bitofabother
11 days ago
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Too real.
francisga
11 days ago
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I love that AIM users are not reachable any other way.
Lafayette, LA, USA
adamgurri
11 days ago
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THIS
New York, NY
mrobold
11 days ago
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The struggle is real.
Orange County, California
JayM
11 days ago
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No bubble for: Email-SMS-Jabber-iMessage-Skype-IRC-TwitterDM-LinkedIn-PrivateForums-NewsBlurComments
Atlanta, GA
mindspillage
11 days ago
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Also, NewsBlur comments.
Mountain View, California
jth
11 days ago
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POST /inbox/new&msg=Hi!%20How%20have%20you%20been%3F%20It%27s%20been%20years%20since%20I%27ve%20seen%20you%20around.
Saint Paul, MN, USA
drchuck
11 days ago
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Nobody uses Wikipedia talk pages?
Long Island, NY
alt_text_bot
11 days ago
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I'm one of the few Instagram users who connects solely through the Unix 'talk' gateway.
HarlandCorbin
11 days ago
I found me on the diagram, i seem to be in a lonely group.

Delicate Sketches of the Original Peace Symbol to be Exhibited in London

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Sketch of nuclear disarmament symbol, by Gerald Holtom. © Commonweal Collection.

Stretching back over a half century, one of the most iconic symbols adopted by the international community has been the peace symbol. Utilized by millions of activists, organizations, and artists across the globe, most people are probably unfamiliar with the design’s unique origins and the meaning behind the multi-pronged symbol.

Artist Gerald Holtom created the symbol for the first Aldermaston March in 1958, part of a series of anti-nuclear weapon demonstrations in the 1950s and 1960s. The symbol was next adopted by the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, and soon peace groups around the world displayed it in a variety of configurations. But what exactly does it mean?

Holtom designed the peace symbol around the visual language of flag semaphores, a telegraphy method for communicating with flags at a distance, combining the letters “N” and “D” standing for “nuclear” and “disarmament.”

Flag semaphores for the letters “N” and “D” and an overlay. Courtesy Wikipedia.

Holtom’s original 1958 sketches are now in extremely fragile condition and are rarely seen in public. However, a few of them, along with 300 objects from a century of anti-war activist campaigns in the UK, will be on view as part of People Power: Fighting for Peace at the Imperial War Museum in London from March 23 through August 28, 2017. You can read more about the peace symbol’s history over on Hyperallergic.

Hey art and design teachers, here’s a fun project idea: have students create new symbols of ideas important to them using flag semaphores or some other symbolic alphabet as a starting point. Send the results to tips@thisiscolossal.com by March 20, 2017 with the subject ‘Peace Project‘ and we’ll share our favorites here on Colossal.

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gevil
31 days ago
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São Paulo -- Brazil
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