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Let the Wild Rumpus Start! A Retrospective Celebrates the Illustrated Classics of the Late Maurice Sendak

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“Where the Wild Things Are” (1963), tempera on paper, 9 ¾ x 11 inches. All images ©The Maurice Sendak Foundation, courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art, shared with permission

The late artist and author Maurice Sendak is responsible for bringing us some of the most beloved, iconic childhood stories, and his distinctive style and fantastical beasts defined classics like In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, and of course, the ever-popular Where the Wild Things Are. Opening this fall at the Columbus Museum of Art, an expansive retrospective surveys Sendak’s unparalleled contributions to both children’s literature and the discipline, more broadly.

Wild Things are Happening is the largest exhibition of the artist’s work to date, containing more than 150 sketches, original illustrations, storyboards, and paintings from his own projects and collaborations. The show also references his myriad inspirations and influences with works by William Blake, Walt Disney, and Beatrix Potter, among others.

Wild Things are Happening runs from October 22, 2022, to March 5, 2023, before heading to Paris and other locations. A concurrent exhibition of Sendak’s performance-based works is on view at the Ballard Institute and Museum of Puppetry in Connecticut through December 16. (via Creative Boom)

 

“Where the Wild Things Are” (1963), tempera on paper, 9 ¾ x 22 inches

Mockup for the Cover of “Nutshell Library” (1962), ink and tempera, 10 3/8 x 8 1/8 inches

“Higglety, Pigglety, Pop!” (1967), ink on paper, 11 ½ x 9 inches

“Little Bear” (1957), ink on paper, 11 x 8 ½ inches

Design for the Poster of “Where the Wild Things Are” and “Higglety Pigglety Pop! Opera,” Glyndebourne Production (1985), watercolor on paper, 33 ½ x 23 ½ inches

“Rosie and Buttermilk, her Cat,” character studies for “Really Rosie” animation (1973), watercolor and ink on paper, 13 ¾ x 15 5/8 inches

“Self-Portrait” (1950), ink on paper, 10 ¾ x 16 ½ inches



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gevil
78 days ago
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São Paulo -- Brazil
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A Nearly 500-Page Monograph Chronicles Three Decades of Olafur Eliasson’s Practice

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“The weather project” (2003), monofrequency lamps, projection screen, haze machines, foil mirror, aluminum, scaffolding, 26.7 x 22.3 x 155.44 meters, installation view at Tate Modern, London. Photo by Tate photography, Andrew Dunkley & Marcus Leith

A forthcoming monograph published by Phaidon packs the inimitable career of artist Olafur Eliasson (previously) into nearly 500 pages. Spanning from the 1990s to today, the expanded edition comprises a breadth of works, including “The Weather Project,” the widely acclaimed installation that took over Tate Modern in 2003, and the more recent “Life,” which flooded Fondation Beyeler in Basel last year with murky green waters. This new volume contains hundreds of photos and illustrations paired with writing by Michelle Kuo, Anna Engberg-Pedersen, and the artist himself and reflects on both the monumental public installations and smaller works that define his practice. Olafur Eliasson, Experience is currently available for pre-order on Bookshop.

 

“Waterfall” (2016), crane tower, water, stainless steel, pump system, hoses, ballast, 42.5 x 6 x 5 meters, installation views at Palace of Versailles. Photo by Anders Sune Berg

“Beauty” (1993), spotlight, water, nozzles, wood, hose, pump, dimensions variable, edition of 3, installation view at Long Museum, Shanghai. Photo by Anders Sune Berg

“Ice Watch” (2014), with Minik Rosing, 12 blocks of glacial ice, dimensions variable, installation views at Place du Panthéon, Paris. Photo by Martin Argyroglo

“Fjordenhus (Fjord House)” designed with Sebastian Behmann (2009–18), Vejle Fjord, Denmark. Photo by Anders Sune Berg

“Seeing Spheres” (2019), stainless steel, glass, silver, fiberglass, LEDs, 4.8 x 22 x 22 meters, each sphere, diameter 480 centimeters, installation view at Chase Center, San Francisco. Photo by Matthew Millman



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gevil
95 days ago
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São Paulo -- Brazil
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This new Pandora jewelry collection uses 100% recycled gold and silver (and lab-grown diamonds)

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The jewelry maker wants to show that there’s demand for recycled silver and gold, even though the materials are currently more expensive than their mined counterparts.

The diamonds, silver, and gold in a new collection of jewelry from Pandora, the world’s largest jewelry producer, are physically identical to stones and metals from mines. But the diamonds were grown in a lab with renewable energy, and all of the gold and silver is recycled.

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gevil
104 days ago
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São Paulo -- Brazil
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Movement and Instinct Inform Taquen’s Murals of Migrating Birds and Human Touch

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“Magpies and swifts.” All images © Taquen, shared with permission

Thin, structural lines delineate a magpie wing and contour a child’s nose or cheekbone in Taquen’s murals. Working with a color palette of pastels and neutral tones, the Spanish artist (previously) paints large-scale portraits, fragments of limbs, and birds, often leaving the composition’s skeletal forms visible. “The supports are just as important as the work itself,” he tells Colossal. “I look for camouflage, minimalism, and mixture. In the end, it is also a metaphorical form of the footprint that I believe we should leave in the places we pass through.”

Many of Taquen’s works consider the relationship between species through the lens of movement and impulse, focusing on gesture, touch, and instinctive acts. Birds mid-flight embody the tie between freedom and migration, while bare feet lounging in the grass or a hand grasping a flower channel a desire for physical contact. “I think we are very disconnected, living in parallel with nature, and it is a mistake. We must share it, experience it, live it, and thus we will be able to understand and respect it,” he says.

In the coming months, the artist will be working on murals in Belgium, Portugal, Ireland, France, and Spain, in addition to a conceptual project centered on paths and walking. You can follow those on Instagram.

 

Briançon, France

Detail of mural in Briançon, France

“Discover and learn,” Port of Sagunto, Valencia

Grenoble

Camprovin

“Hold the oak, be a tree for the trees,” Mostar

“Apology for the wild,” Stockholm, Sweden

Madrid. Photo by Gustavo Bulnes



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gevil
105 days ago
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São Paulo -- Brazil
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Dense Cross-Hatching Adds Deceptive Volume to Albert Chamillard’s Geometric Drawings

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All images © Albert Chamillard, shared with permission

On vintage ledgers and notebooks, artist Albert Chamillard (previously) harnesses the power of crosshatching and simple outlines to render flat, geometric shapes that appear to emerge from the page. The meditative works utilize varying densities to add depth and volume to clusters of cylinders or undulating, ribbon-like forms. By rendering each piece in a monochromatic palette of black or red, the artist draws attention to the meticulously laid lines and deceptive dimension of the forms.

Currently, Chamillard is preparing for a solo show opening on December 3 at Etherton Gallery in Tucson, where he lives. He’s also been collaborating with Hermès on a series of works soon to be released, and you can follow updates on those pieces and find an archive of his painstaking drawings on Instagram.

 



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gevil
105 days ago
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New Study Suggests Coffee During Pregnancy May Be OK After All

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A new genetic study suggests drinking coffee during pregnancy does not negatively affect birthweight, nor does it increase the risk of a miscarriage, stillbirth, or premature birth.  

The study, by researchers at the University of Queensland in Australia and the University of Oslo, counters the advice often given during pregnancy to avoid caffeine. That advice was based on observational studies that did not separate coffee drinking from the harmful effects of behaviors like smoking, drinking alcohol, or poor nutrition.  

Randomized Stidy

But in this study the researchers focused solely on the effects of drinking coffee. 

They used data from several sources, including UK Biobank and from 23andMe customers who consented to participate in research. Ideally, the researchers would have isolated the effects of drinking coffee by doing a randomized trial. This would have required recruiting a very large group of pregnant women and then requiring some to drink coffee, and the others would not be allowed to drink coffee. Then researchers would monitor the effect on their pregnancies. For several reasons, that study design is not feasible in this case. So instead, the researchers used Mendelian randomization to mimic a randomized trial. They did this by first looking at genetic variants associated with drinking coffee and then seeing if they also affect pregnancy outcomes.

Using this genetic analysis, the researchers found no causation between drinking coffee during pregnancy and pregnancy risks for miscarriage, stillbirth, or premature birth.

Moderation

At the same time, the study only looked at a handful of adverse pregnancy outcomes, leaving the possibility that drinking coffee could affect other aspects of a baby’s development.

“For that reason, we don’t recommend a high intake during pregnancy, but a low or moderate consumption of coffee,” said Dr. Gunn-Helen Moen, a lead researcher for the study.

This research used genetic data from the Coffee and Caffeine Genetics Consortium, the UK Biobank, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, and customers from 23andMe who consented to participate in research.

The study was published in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

The post New Study Suggests Coffee During Pregnancy May Be OK After All appeared first on 23andMe Blog.

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gevil
105 days ago
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